Photo Essay: The Royal Mail Ship Olympic

The Royal Mail Ship Olympic  1910-1935

 

The RMS Olympic in New York CIty, 1911
The RMS Olympic in New York City, 1911

The RMS Olympic was a cruise ship on the White Star Line.  Launched in 1910, it would be in service until 1935 – part of that as a troop ship in WWI.  It was the largest liner in the world from 1911 – 1913, except for the Titanic (also a White Star Line).

Her maiden voyage began on 14 June, 1911 in Southampton, England and finished in New York City on 21 June, 1911, seven days later.

RMS Olympic Grand Staircase, 1911
RMS Olympic Grand Staircase, 1911
RMS Olympic - another view of the stairs - 1911
RMS Olympic – another view of the stairs – 1911
RMS Olympic – 1st Class Dining Room – 1911
RMS Olympic reading room - 1911
RMS Olympic reading room – 1911
RMS Olympic Palm Court, 1911
RMS Olympic Palm Court, 1911
RMS Olympic 2nd class entry and deck - 1911
RMS Olympic 2nd class entry and deck – 1911

The Olympic was retired in 1935 and sold for scrap  Olympic had completed 257 round trips across the Atlantic, transporting 430,000 passengers on her commercial voyages, travelling 1.8 million miles.

 

Photos from:  Library of Congress

North Shore Lake Superior

Very early in 2017, I learned about the Thunder Bay Blues Fest.  The event features 100% Canadian talent, so I booked a VIP pass and began making plans.  Held during the first weekend of July, I made this into a road trip, planning to do a circle tour of Lake Superior.  Two days driving, but it realistically should have taken three.

Day one was an extremely long, tiresome day, having to first drive partly through the traffic mess that Toronto has become.  North on the highway, and by about 16:00 I was settled into the Watertower Inn in Sault Ste Marie.

First stop was Batchawana Bay, which is 71km north and west of the Sault.  Two centuries ago you would see voyageurs here, sheltered from the storms of Lake Superior.

 

Beautiful Batchawana Bay, North Shore, Lake Superior
Beautiful Batchawana Bay, North Shore, Lake Superior

Moving 43km north, my next stop was Alona Bay.  Here is Theano Point, believed to be the first uranium find in Canada.  Also nearby, the wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald.

Alona Bay, North Shore, Lake Superior
Alona Bay, North Shore, Lake Superior

Move along another 90km north, through Lake Superior Provincial Park, and the next stop is Old Woman Bay.  There are cliffs with forests, and a beach for your pleasure.

Old Woman Bay, North Shore, Lake Superior
Old Woman Bay, North Shore, Lake Superior

We now move inland, through the small town of White River (with a cute coffee shop) and travel 284km north and east to Aguasabon Falls, just west of Terrace Bay.  There is a well-built viewing platform to take you near the falls.

Augasabon Falls, North Shore, Lake Superior
Augasabon Falls, North Shore, Lake Superior

Travelling 204km west, we are nearing our destination.  We know we’ve arrived when we’re at the Terry Fox Memorial, just outside of Thunder Bay.  His goal was to run across Canada, beginning in Newfoundland.  This is where he was forced to end his journey.

Terry Fox Memorial, Thunder Bay, Ontario
Terry Fox Memorial, Thunder Bay, Ontario

The Lyceum Theatre opened its doors in the former Port Arthur in 1908, with seating for one thousand.  There have been many changes of ownership and usage, with the ground floor being used for office/retail.

Remodeled in 1932 for “talking pictures”, it closed permanently in 1955.

The Prince Arthur Hotel originally built by CN, is on the same street, and dates from 1911.

 

The Prince Arthur Hotel, Thunder Bay, Ontario
The Prince Arthur Hotel, Thunder Bay, Ontario

Thirty kilometers west of Thunder Bay is Kakabeka Falls, a waterfall on the Kaministiquia River.  It is the highest waterfall in North America.

Kakabeka Falls, west of Thunder Bay
Kakabeka Falls, west of Thunder Bay

 

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Four Days in York, UK

York, UK

I just can’t resist a seat sale.

Early in 2016, Iceland Air had a seat sale to London.  I waffled over this for some time, and left it up on my screen.  $650 was a good price for a flight from YYZ – LGW, including a stopover in KEF on my return.  Finally, after three days I went for it.  Refreshed my screen, and the price is now $502.  I would be on my way to York in a few months.

During the planning process, I thought I’d spend time in London and Manchester.  My friend said why?  They’re just two big cities.  She’d go to York.  Then somebody else chimed in that if you’re going to York, you should do Lincoln also.

I arrived in London Gatwick at 11:45 and easily sailed through customs.  I had pre-purchased most of my train tickets, so my next stop was St Pancras International.  King’s Cross was right across the street, and I was on the 15:08 to York.

I had some rudimentary instructions to get to my hotel, so I decided to walk it.  I had to go past the Mickelgate Bar, and look for Scarcroft road.  Down that street would be the Wheatlands Lodge Hotel.

Wheatlands Lodge, York UK
My hotel in York – Wheatlands Lodge

Here we have a number of town homes converted into a hotel.  There is a bar and they serve a great breakfast.  My room was in one of the dormer windows.  No elevator!

York Minster

York Minster
The Cathedral and Metropolitical Church of Saint Peter in York

The second largest Gothic cathedral in northern Europe, construction began in the 1200’s.  This is the main attraction in the centre of town, however there is still  the original wall, and various gates (called BARS).

The Micklegate Bar is the original Royal Entrance.  Think of King Henry VIII coming through here, or the severed heads of his enemies staked upon it.

St Mary’s Abbey

The remains of St Mary's Abbey
The remains of St Mary’s Abbey

Located in the gardens of the Yorkshire Museum, the ruins of St Mary’s Abbey, which was a Benedictine Order established in 1088.  The Abbey was closed and substantially destroyed during the dissolution of the church by King Henry VIII.

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Day Trip to Sheffield, UK

September of 2016, I spent three wonderful weeks in England.  I arrived at Gatwick Airport, hopped a train to St Pancras International Station, crossed the street to King’s Cross, and boarded another train north.  My visit included York, Lincoln, Sheffield, London, Stratford and Bath.

I was staying in Lincoln for a few days, and one afternoon when I had nothing to do, I checked out the train schedule.  For a small sum, and little travel time, a visit to Sheffield was in order.

On arrival at the train station, I exited away from the city centre.  Up a rather steep hill, then a walk down Norfolk Avenue past the Shrewsbury Hospital Estate.

Gated entry to Shrewsbury Hospital Estate, Sheffield
Gated entry to Shrewsbury Hospital Estate, Sheffield

Further on, is the Cholera Monument Grounds and Clay Wood, part of Sheaf Valley Park.

First thing I notice is that it is very quiet.  There are a few people jogging around the path, but not much else.  A vast expanse of green, with the monument in the distance.

This park was used as a burial ground during the cholera epidemic of 1832.  402 victims are buried here, and the monument was erected in 1835.

Cholera Monument, Sheffield, UK.  Erected in 1835 after the epidemic of 1832.
Cholera Monument, Sheffield, UK. Erected in 1835 after the epidemic of 1832.

This area is also the home of Clay Wood and Norfolk Park.  The park opened in 1848 on land owned by the Duke of Norfolk.  The park was officially given to the city of Sheffield in 1910.

Cholera Monument, Sheffield, UK.  Erected in 1835 after the epidemic of 1832.
Archway in Norfolk Park, Sheffield, UK
Lime Avenue, a beautiful laneway of trees planted in the 1800's
Lime Avenue, a beautiful laneway of trees planted in the 1800’s

At the entrance to Norfolk Park on Granville Road, exists an original Victorian light standard.  Although originally gas, it has been converted to electric.

Victorian Light Standard at entrance to Norfolk Park on Granville Road
Victorian Light Standard at entrance to Norfolk Park on Granville Road

The Cholera Monument and grounds, Norfolk Park and the Lamp Standard have all been listed Grade II

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Preview of Changes and Upcoming Travel

New Developments

It’s early 2017.  We’re having decent weather on the sunshine coast of Florida.  Mostly sunny, and starting to get warm.  There has been very little rain, and only a couple of storms. My only travel has been local –  to Orlando, Tampa and St Petersburg.

I’ve been spending my winters in Florida for the past eight years.  I bought a condo in an adult only development.  From here, I have been able to fly or drive to Puerto Rico, Belize, Las Vegas, Turkey, Orlando, Fort Lauderdale, Key West, Baton Rouge, New Orleans, and Panama City.

Now, it’s time to go.  The US government has made a sharp turn to the right, and I think it will get worse.  I’ve sold my condo, and will be departing on 16th March, not to return.

Packing up the house is a chore, and most of what I own has been sold.  I’ll be spending one night in Corbin, Kentucky, and should arrive in Canada by the 18th of March.

2017 Travel

25th April – This is a bit up in the air at the moment.  I have booked a few days in Lansing, MI, thanks to IHG Points Breaks.  Since then, an event has come up in Warrendale, PA that I’d like to attend.  Can’t do both, but I have some time to decide.

9th May – Today I depart for my first trip to Greece.  I’ll be based in Athens, and have a trip to Delphi scheduled.  There is a travel break to Santorini, then back to Athens.  I have booked an apartment through Ebab which has a view of the Acropolis.

6th July – This week I’ll be doing a circle tour of Lake Superior, by car.  First stop is Sault Ste Marie, then three days in Thunder Bay.

Poster for the 2017 Thunder Bay Blues Fest - last year attendance was over 18,000
Summer travel to the 2017 Thunder Bay Blues Fest – last year attendance was over 18,000

I’ll be at the festival for all three days, then departing on Monday for a leisurely drive to a place called Iron Mountain, MI.  Two days later I’ll be back home.

7th November – This day I depart Toronto for twelve days in China.  In addition to Beijing, I have a balcony cabin for a cruise on the Yangtze River.

That’s all that I have planned for this year, however I’m quite certain some smaller trips will work their way in.  Beyond this list, I travel to Kenya and Tanzania in October, 2018.

 

Travel Review 2016

2016 was not a great year for travel.  Due to circumstances out of my control, I was unable to spend my usual winter at my condo in Florida.  I was in Canada from October until April 1st, when I went to Florida for one week.

Eartha Kitty stayed home for this trip.  I took I75 south to Kentucky, where I turned onto secondary highways, passing through Crittenden, Dry Ridge, Williamstown, Mason, Corinth, Sadieville, Georgetown, Lexington, Nicholasville, Lancaster and Crab Orchard, finally settling in at Barbourville, KY.

Downtown Barbourville, Kentucky. An interesting place, the Magic Theatre has been closed for ages.
Downtown Barbourville, Kentucky. An interesting place, the Magic Theatre has been closed for ages.

Towards the closing of April, I went to Cincinnati for a long weekend, thanks to IHG Rewards Points.  I stayed at the Staybridge Suites in West Chester out in the suburbs.  No complaint; it was a decent hotel, and mostly free.

Surprisingly lots to do in Cincinnati.  The American Sign Museum was a treat, situated near the old Crossley factory.  The Taft Museum, Smashburger, the Findlay Market, the OTR Candy Bar and the Over The Rhine neighbourhood all worth a vist.  Bonus for crossing the border to Newport, KY.

GhostSign for the former Dennison Hotel, downtown Cincinnati, Ohio
GhostSign for the former Dennison Hotel, downtown Cincinnati, Ohio

May brought a trip to Vancouver, British Columbia.  I stayed in a condo, on the top floor of an apartment building with a great view of English bay Beach.  There was a new Nordstrom on Robson Street, and my first full day I had lunch at the Ovaltine Cafe on East Hastings Street.  Late that afternoon, a trip to Horseshoe Bay and the Spirit Gallery.

Stanley Park, the Lennox Pub, Chinatown, the Vogue Theatre, Fountainhead Pub among the places I went.  I rented a car and went to Whistler (Squamish Lil’wat Cultural Centre), Squamish, Abbotsford, Chilliwack and Harrison Hot Springs.

The view from my condo, just off Davie Street in Vancouver.
The view from my condo, just off Davie Street in Vancouver.

June 22nd I arrived in Los Angeles for the first time, staying in Westwood.  Budget provided me with a Kia Soul for the week, which turned out fairly good.  Not nice to look at, but easy to drive and comfortable inside.

The Hammer Museum was almost across the street.

The Getty Center was a great trip, as was Santa Monica.  Rodeo Drive, Beverley Hills, The Walk of Fame, LACMA and the Petersen Automotive Museum were visited.  Pueblo de Los Angeles, The Museum of Tolerance (Anne Frank exhibit) and the LaBrea Tar Pits were also included.

A side trip with friends took me to Santa Barbara and the Old Mission.  I bought a painting, now hanging above my fireplace at the craft market at the waterfront.

Interior of historic Union Station in downtown Los Angeles, opened in 1939.
Interior of historic Union Station in downtown Los Angeles, opened in 1939.

Iceland Air had a seat sale, so in September I flew to England, landing in Gatwick on the 20th.  From there, I boarded a train to St Pancras Station, switched to King’s Cross, and I was off to York.

I stayed at the Wheatlands Lodge Hotel – a series of Victorian town homes converted to a hotel; an easy walk to the Mickelgate Bar.  York itself is a magnificent city dating to Roman times.  One can walk the wall, visit the York Minster, the Yorkshire Museum and many other features.  The Viking Museum was closed due to floods.

Highly recommended:  a day trip through the Yorkshire Dales with BOB Holidays.  It takes nine hours, and well worth it.  Includes a stop at the “Oldest Sweet Shop in the World” in Harrogate and The Falcon Inn in Arncliffe.

A two hour train ride, four days later, and I’m in Lincoln.  Everything seems to be uphill from here.  I stayed at a B&B called The Poplars.  Nice place with friendly cats.

Lincoln Cathedral is the highlight, as is the high street for shopping.  While here, I took a side trip to Sheffield, checking out the Cholera Monument and Lime Avenue.

Four days later, I travel to London, where I stay for eight days.

The Norman House, in Lincoln, UK, dated to 1170.
The Norman House, in Lincoln, UK, dated to 1170.

One of the perks of travel with Iceland air is a free stopover in Iceland.  I chose to take mine at the end of my trip, arriving on 4th October.

The entire stay was dogged with pounding rain, cold and violent winds.  The Blue Lagoon was a wonderful respite, despite the weather.  The Golden Circle Tour heavily marred by the storms.

When visiting Iceland, take tons of money.

Hallgrímskirkja is a Lutheran Church and one of the tallest buildings in the country.
Hallgrímskirkja is a Lutheran Church and one of the tallest buildings in the country.

 

 

 

Vancouver Heritage

 

There are a number of magnificent heritage buildings in downtown Vancouver, many of which are re-purposed banks.

At the turn of the 1900’s, banks gave their depositors a show of strength by building these monuments.  By the end of the 19th century, most of these had been sold off and the banks now rented properties.

 

The Henry Birk's Store, Downtown Vancouver Heritage Property
The Henry Birk’s Store, Downtown Vancouver

Henry Birk’s store was built in 1908 as a show of strength by the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce.  It is located at Granville and West Hastings.

Morris J Wosk Centre for Dialogue - part of Simon Fraser University
Morris J Wosk Centre for Dialogue – part of Simon Fraser University

This was originally built as a Toronto-Dominion Bank in 1910.  The bank abandoned this location in 1984 and the building became derelict.  It was donated to the University in 2000.

Heritage detail above the entrance to the former TD Bank
TD Bank Detail

Detail of the door on the right in the previous photo.

 

Former Post Office
Former Post Office

The former post office is located at the corner of Granville and West Hastings.  Construction began in 1905 and the building was completed in 1910.  The four clocks in the tower are twelve feet in diameter and were restored in the 1980’s.  Similar to the banks, the post office (then ROYAL MAIL) built monuments.

The building was incorporated into the Sinclair Centre, part of a downtown Vancouver shopping centre, which incorporated several other heritage properties.

Vancouver is probably the most beautiful city in Canada.  Easily walkable, with lots of neighbourhoods, parks and beaches to occupy your time.

They have demonstrated an interest in preserving heritage properties.  I can only hope that this continues as gentrification comes to East Hastings Street.

Return to Vancouver, BC, Spring 2016

WestJet had a seat sale, so I thought it was time for another trip to Vancouver, BC.

I usually book trips based on a seat sale and where I want to go.  One of the conditions of this sale required me to take a flight with three stops.  I departed from London, ON (YXU), next stop was Winnipeg, MB (YWG), followed by Calgary, AB (YYC), where we had an opportunity to deplane for thirty minutes, finally arriving in Vancouver, BC (YVR).  Not a terrible way to spend an afternoon.

I had booked accommodation through EBAB – a site I have used before, although mostly in Europe.  I just off Davie Street, within walking distance of English Bay Beach.

The view from my balcony in Vancouver, near English Bay Beach.
The view from my balcony in Vancouver, near English Bay Beach.

It was evening when I arrived.  The apartment owner picked me up at the airport, and made dinner.  I settled in for the night.

Early the next morning, it was time to venture out.  I took a wander down Robson Street, where I had stayed on my previous trip.  Locals are making a big deal over a new Nordstrom store that recently opened.  Lunch brought me to the Ovaltine Cafe on East Hastings Street.  It’s easy to see that gentrification is encroaching.

The Ovaltine Cafe on East Hasting Street - in business since 1943.
The Ovaltine Cafe on East Hastings Street – in business since 1943.

Late afternoon the apartment owner calls, asks if I want to take a trip!  He picks me up downtown, and we’re off to Horseshoe Bay.  It’s a small village nearby in West Vancouver.  We stopped into the Spirit Gallery, where I bought a piece of native art for my home.  It barely fit in my carry-on.

The BC Ferries dock at Horseshoe Bar
The BC Ferries dock at Horseshoe Bay

We returned to Vancouver and had dinner at the apartment.  I went for a walk in the dark, toward the Pacific Ocean, where I discovered that at the end of Davie Street is English Bay Beach.  Great for a little evening relaxation.

My trip starts out well, with a packed first day.  Six more days to go.  Early mornings, late evenings, lots of walking, a car rental, and side trips to Harrison Hot Springs, Chilliwack and Whistler.

More to come…

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Warren Pennsylvania Weekend

Every quarter, IHG Rewards has a special called PointBreaks.  Hotels across the world are available for booking at five thousand points nightly.  I’ve taken advantage of this many times.  Sometimes the hotels are inconveniently located, sometimes they have just been renovated, at other times the hotel is about to be reflagged.

My recent stay was in Warren, Pennsylvania – I though a small town retreat would be good.  Warren is located near the Allegheny National Forest.

The Holiday Inn is located on the outskirts of town – at first look I thought it was a converted government building.  This hotel was quite large, with a restaurant and a bar.

This building is located in downtown Warren. Referred to by locals as "The Point"
This building is located in downtown Warren. Referred to by locals as “The Point”
Fountain outside The Point
Fountain outside The Point – not working, likely do to the time of year of my visit.

The Plaza Diner came recommended by the clerk at the Holiday Inn.  I could have eaten at the hotel, but I was looking for something local.  It was quite packed, given the size of the town.  I sat at the counter, watching the work.  There are two kitchens – one in the front window, the other hidden from view.

Plaza Diner downtown Warren, PA
Plaza Diner downtown Warren, PA

Duffy’s came recommended by one of the local bartenders.  Long and narrow, I sat at the bar at the back.  Famous for their grilled vegetables, which were excellent.  There are many ghost signs in Warren – the one beside Duffy’s is for a previous business, advertising an Oyster and Chop House.

Duffy's - Ghost Sign
Duffy’s – on a side street just of the main
The nearby Kinzua Dam
The nearby Kinzua Dam

On my way out of town, the hotel staff recommended that I stop and see the Kinzua Bridge, so I took a trip through the National Forest to find it.

Road Sign - Longhouse Scenic Byway
Longhouse Scenic Byway

Almost unannounced, this appears.  Pennsylvania was a major producer of oil, and this is one of the few remaining power houses, long decommissioned.

Powerhouse Historic Site
Powerhouse Historic Site

I reach my destination – the Kinzua Bridge in Mt Jewett, PA.  Originally a railroad bridge, three hundred feet high and two thousand feet long, it was opened in 1882 and closed permanently in 2003.  A tornado went through the valley, collapsing the supports.

It’s now becoming a state tourist attraction.  One can walk out the train tracks, and there’s a viewing platform at the end, with a glass floor.

Kinzua Bridge, Mt Jewett
Kinzua Bridge, Mt Jewett

Mount Jewett, Pennsylvania is located about half an hour from Warren.

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The Old St Thomas Church

Completed in 1824, the St Thomas Anglican Church is one of the oldest structures in the city.  It was in continuous use until 1877, and designated a heritage property in 1982.  In 1877, the significantly larger Trinity Anglican Church was built.

Restoration of the church took place in 1986.

It is still in service as church on special days, is available for tours, and weddings.  The graveyard is still active, and has had a scattering garden added recently.

 

Gateway to the Old St Thomas Church
Gateway to the Old St Thomas Church
Gateway to the Old St Thomas Church
Your first view of the Old St Thomas Church from inside the gate.
The St Thomas Historical Board commemorated the 100th anniversary of the church in 1924.
The Elgin Historical Board commemorated the 100th anniversary of the church in 1924.

The interior of the church remains much as it did when built.  Cubicle style pews, a prisoner’s box, historical artifacts and original windows.

http://oldstthomaschurch.com/
The church was closed when I was there, and this was the only picture I could get through a reachable window. The rear of the church is on a hill and is not accessible.

The most significant monument is for the Chisholm family, who had seven family members die within seven years.  Constructed of Italian marble on a sandstone base, at the time it cost $5,000 – the price of two homes.

Folklore has it that the family had the Curse of Ireland.  In addition to all immediate family members dying within seven years, none died in their beds.

The Chisholm Monument
The Chisholm Monument
The gravestone of Ann Payne, born in 1762 and dies in 1834.
The gravestone of Ann Payne, born in 1762 and died in 1834.

Many of the graves have suffered the effects of age, acid rain, and even vandalism.

Old St Thomas Church Graveyard
Old St Thomas Church Graveyard

Buried here are the son of Daniel Rapelje (founder of St Thomas), Judge Hugh Richardson (sentenced Louis Riel to death) and Octavius Wallace (Canadian, fought as a corporal during the US Civil War).

Sometimes, small towns and cities hold the most memorable treasures.

 

 

** UPDATE **

Doors Open Ontario came to St Thomas early in October, 2014, and I was able to tour the interior of the church.

Interior, stained glass window, Old St Thomas Church
Interior, stained glass window, Old St Thomas Church

The interior of the church, from above the front door.  the rear of the church backs onto a ravine.  These are the only (not original) stained glass windows.

Interior, Old St Thomas Church
Interior, Old St Thomas Church

Early in its history, the church did not have stained glass windows.  The windows were painted to resemble them.  This is the last one remaining, still in place.

The last remaining painted window in the Old St Thomas Church
The last remaining painted window in the Old St Thomas Church