Fading Signs

I have a certain attraction for signs when I’m on my travels.  Painted signs are excellent, and neon are particularly fine, even if they aren’t working.  There are lots of neon signs to view in museums, but I have a fondness for those left in place.

New Castle, Delaware

This town was originally settled in 1651 by Peter Stuyvesant of the Dutch West India Company.  In 1680 New Castle was transferred to William Penn.

Overlooking the Delaware River, New Castle has 5200 residents and is the oldest continuously occupied town in the Delaware Valley.  The town itself is not a museum.  The historic homes are privately owned and operated.

Ivory Soap
Fading Sign: Ivory soap on a wall in New Castle, Delaware
Coca-Cola
Fading Signs: Two on this wall – Coca-Cola and the N Katz & Sons Fine Tailors

Hot Springs, Arkansas

There are many signs on this wall.  It appears to have been a hotel a some point, but the most obvious is the Tom Moore Ten Cent Cigar.  Underneath that is a Coca-Cola sign.  At the very bottom is the words “Milwaukee Wis”.

 

Hot Springs
Fading Signs: Multiple use wall in Hot Springs, Arkansas

 

Colorado Springs, Colorado

The Carriage House of Established 1886.  Located at 115 N Tejon Street, Colorado Springs

Colorado Springs
Fading Signs: Carriage House of Colorado Springs

 

St Augustine, FL

Somewhere in St Augustine, Florida, a cocktail lounge and package store, long forgotten.

St Augustine
Fading Signs: Cocktail Lounge somewhere in St Augustine, Florida

This is just a small sampling of what I have.  You can check my Pinterest account for more, under the topic “Signs in History”.  Vancouver and San Francisco offered a plethora of neon signs, both restored and somewhat battered.  From time to time I’ll be making more posts like this, if only for my enjoyment.

 

 

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