Sherbourne Street Toronto

There’s lots to see and do in Toronto, some off the well worn tourist path.  Sherbourne Street stretches from Bloor to the lakeshore (where it’s called “Lower Sherbourne”.  I took a stroll from Carlton Street to Richmond.

Parish of the Sacred Heart
Parish of the Sacred Heart, at the corner of Carlton and Sherbourne

Located on the northeast corner, Paroisse du Sacre Coeur was built in 1936, despite looking significantly older.  The building was expanded in 1951, and remains an active French language church.

St Luke's United Church
St Luke’s United Church, at the corner of Carlton and Sherbourne

Located on the southwest side of Sherbourne, St Luke’s United Church.  Opened in 1887 as Sherbourne Street Methodist, later Sherbourne United.  This church amalgamated with Carlton United to form the present entity.

Allen Gardens Conservatory
Allan Gardens Conservatory

One of Toronto’s oldest parks, Allan Gardens is situated between Carlton, Sherbourne, Gerrard and Horticultural streets.  The conservatory was built in 1910 and is designated under the Ontario Heritage Act.

Robbie Burns
Robbie Burns

Allan Gardens has had significant changes over the years, including two wings to the conservatory.  There was a massive fountain in front of the conservatory which has long been lost to history.

In 1902, the Toronto Burns Monument Committee gave the city a life size statue of Robbie Burns which still stands.  Located midway down Sherbourne Street, the statue faces into the park.

John Ross Robertson House
John Ross Robertson House

John Ross Robertson was a philanthropist and publisher who lived in this house from 1881 – 1918.  He published the first school newspaper, was city editor and The Globe and later founded The Daily Telegraph.  In 1876 he founded The Evening Telegraph which became on of Toronto’s most influential newspapers.

True Love Cafe
True Love Cafe

The exotic purple and red True Love Cafe, located at Sherbourne and Dundas.  They have an extensive reasonably priced menu, and acoustic jams on the weekends.  A large space that’s good for the neighbourhood.

Mansion at 230 Sherbourne Street
Mansion at 230 Sherbourne Street

Located just south of Dundas Street, this mansion was derelict for many years.  Dating from appoximately 1872, it housed William Dineen, a prominent furrier.  As the neighbourhood declined, it became a rooming house, and eventually was an empty, boarded up shell.  The absentee landlord applied for a demolition  permit, which was denied, and the building received heritage status.

The home has been restored within the last five years, but remains vacant.

Sherbourne and Queen
Sherbourne and Queen

Toronto has many buildings similar to this in various states of repair.  Although most still have residential occupants and businesses at ground level, this location has been abandoned for years.

A 2008 Toronto Star article refers to the area as “skid row”.  Even today, this area is laced with trendy boutiques and million dollar condos within sight.

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One thought on “Sherbourne Street Toronto

  1. Hi,
    Thanks a lot for sharing about the Toronto with the readers of your write up. this information helps me a lot to explore the city more easily because I am new in the tow. Thanks for sharing and keep it up.

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