Tag Archives: aviation

Air Canada Fares

Air Canada advertises on their website “Air Canada Lowest Price Guarantee always at AirCanada.com

An opportunity to check this out came today.

There is a return flight in July from JFK – DUS via Air Canada available on Orbitz for $869.00

A quick check at the Air Canada website shows this same return trip, on the same dates (20 July/26July) is priced at $1169.00.  The actual trip is JFK-YYZ-DUS, then DUS-YYZ-JFK.  $300.00 in savings are available by not using the guaranteed lowest price at Air Canada dot com.

Also, because this trip involves Tango and Lufthansa, Aeroplan miles would accumulate at 50% for part of the trip, and 0% for another part of the trip.

When I eliminate the JFK – YYZ leg of the trip, and using the same parameters, a return flight from YYZ – DUS comes in at a whopping $1818.00

What this means is I could book a return flight from YYZ – JFK on Air Canada’s website, book the Orbitz flight from JFK – DUS, and save $481.00 versus flying direct from YYZ – DUS.

Confusing?  Damn right!

 

All prices converted to Canadian Dollars.

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Frequent Flyer Follies – The End

The story is over….

I checked my Aeroplan account today, and my balance has made a considerable jump.

There were two flights remaining from Egypt Air, dating back to September, which had never been credited to my account, despite my jumping through hoops providing proof.  My Aeroplan number was even on the boarding pass.

I can’t discern when these credits came through, since they show up on the dates my flights would have occurred.  None of credits specifiy Egypt Air – all are from “AE Customer Service”.

  • 4,200 Miles dated 31 August
  • 314 Miles dated 3 September
  • 530 Miles dated 7 September

Having arrived at this point, I won’t pursue this any further.  The 4,200 miles must be for JFK – CAI, although I was credited 5,600 miles for CAI – JFK.

Two weeks ago I flew United to Las Vegas, a total of five flights.  All but the last connection JAX – TPA have been credited to my account.  I don’t think I’ll bother following this up.

Unless Aeroplan does something to piss me off again.

 

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Frequent Flyer Follies

The story continues…

I contacted Aeroplan on 28th November.  Still little progress, but the agent (Mark) said all outstanding miles would be posted to my account by 12th December.  I’m skeptical, of course.

Turned out I was correct.  I waited for the new year before contacting Aeroplan again.  This time, I’m told that Mark couldn’t possibly have any idea about when these miles would be credited.  This time, I’m told to wait ten weeks from the time I spoke with Mark, so my next call time will be 7th February, unless, for some remote reason, the two remaining flights actually get taken care of.

Since I stated this process last September, the majority of the small flights have been credited.  I’d give up, except one flight is worth 5,600 miles – far too much to let go.  Aeroplan puts the reponsibility entirely with Egypt Air.

I’m left with these two flights, one in August, one in September outstanding

  • JFK – CAI
  • ABS – CAI

Next week, I have five flights scheduled on United, another Star Alliance partner.  I’m wondering if I’ll have the same problems?

 

 

 

Frequent Flyer Follies

Earlier this month, I went on a tour through Egypt, which encompassed seven flights.  All except two flights were booked through a travel agency.  Two airlines, EgyptAir and Air Canada were used, and all flights qualified for Aeroplan miles.

The travel agency was provided with my Aeroplan number, but didn’t provide it to the airlines.  At the conclusion of the trip, only three of the seven flights were credited to my account.

No problem, I thought, as I filed a claim through the Aeroplan website.  Much to my surprise, despite having copies of my etickets and boarding passes (one of which even has my Aeroplan number on it), all claims were denied, with what appears to be a standard response: There is no record with the airline for the passenger name submitted. If the name was incorrectly entered, please resubmit your request with the full name as it appears on your ticket.

There are no spelling mistakes, and everything is correct. 

In an earlier case involving a flight from Chicago in June, I have been asked to submit both a copy of my boarding pass and my eticket.  I thought the purpose of an eticket was to eliminate paperwork.  In this situation Air Canada was able to provide a copy of the ticket within two days.

The claim process was started this week.  Let’s see how long it takes to come to a successful fulfillment.